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Time for some things to change...

Posted on February 23, 2017 at 10:55 PM Comments comments (0)

 

Hey there everyone,

 

Robert here, better known as Your Geeky Tipster, and I think it's time for some serious changes.

 

As many of you know, I am a long time sufferer of anxiety and depression. It's an ongoing struggle that I often deal with and one of my main outlets for dealing with it is YouTube. I love making videos and hosting live streams for my audience. It's become my primary escape when overcoming the struggles of life. Having said that, I think I've been pushing myself too far.

 

Over the past few years, I've dealt with many things in my personal life that have been both stressful and contributed to further progressing my anxiety and depression. Stress at work, in my family, over finances and many other things have overwhelmed me in ways that I can't even begin to communicate properly.

 

At the same time, I have made efforts to step up my game on YouTube. Things like providing daily content and engaging with my audience regularly. I want to make something great of my channel and I've always believed that hard work and dedication can help you achieve anything. And while I certainly enjoy creating content and engaging with you all, I also feel like I'm putting a lot of pressure on myself to deliver. For example, I had a literal breakdown last night when I ran into tech issues while trying to stream. As fun as making videos is, all this pressure to do my best only results contributes to even more stress.

 

Tonight I had the worst anxiety attack of my life. I didn't get much sleep last night due to staying up all night editing videos and further resolving the previously mentioned tech issues, I worked overtime at my day job today and work got so busy that I didn't get a chance to take lunch. During the drive home I began to hyperventilate to the point that I had to pull over and get out of my car to breath. After a few minutes I thought I was okay so I got back in the car and proceeded to drive home. This process repeated 2 more times during the course of the entire drive home.

 

As much as I love making videos, I feel like I am seriously putting too much pressure on myself to give you all my best. I feel like I am putting too much pressure on myself to put out daily content and I feel like all this pressure in addition to the stress of life is starting to have a negative impact on my health and well being. And as such, I think it's time to take a step back.

 

Now don't worry. I'm not entirely stepping away from YouTube, nor am I taking a break. I simply think I need to spend less time working on YouTube videos. Instead of putting so much pressure on myself, I'll go back to uploading when I have the time and energy. No more late nights to get out a video for the following day. No more putting deadlines on myself. And no more stressing myself out if things don't go so smoothly.

 

At the end of the day, I feel like this will result in both better quality content as well as a better healthier me. I wanna thank you all for your support and understanding. The #YourGeekyNation is easily one of the best communities on YouTube and I thank you all for everything you all have done for me during my 10 years as a content creator.

 

So to wrap this up, a tip of the day. Don't constantly pressure yourself into doing your best. Your health and well being is more important, so put that first. Besides, doing your best doesn't have to be that hard. Just do what you can and it will all work out in the end. Thank you all for taking the time to read my novel, and as always, I'll see you all next time. ��

 

- Robert


Setup a Raspberry Pi and Install Retro Pi

Posted on March 28, 2016 at 11:05 PM Comments comments (0)

The following tutorial was created in conjunction with the YouTube video found HERE. You can follow along with that video or just follow the steps below. Please not that the following guide was made for use with the CanaKit found HERE which includes a MicroSD Card preloaded with NOOBS. If you purchased your Raspberry Pi and MicroSD Card separatly, you will need to follow the guide HERE to install NOOBS. 


Setting Up Your Raspberry Pi


Plug your Raspberry Pi into a monitor, keyboard and mouse then power it on by connecting a MicroUSB Power Adaptor. Once powered on, the Pi will boot into a menu with a list of operating systems to install. Depending on the version of NOOBS you are running, this list may vary. For this guide, we will be installing the Raspien OS. Click the check box next to Raspien and click "Install" and "Yes" to confirm. This will take a while, so be patient. 


Once the install is completed, select "Finish" and "Reboot". This will reboot the Raspberry Pi and eventually present you with the Rasbien Desktop. From there, open the Terminal (Black Screen Icon) and proceed to the next step. 


Install RetroPie


Note: The following commands are case sensitive and must be entered as you see them here. Once you type in a command, het "Enter" on your keyboard to execute it. 


The following commands will install two packages nessecary to run RetroPie:


sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get install -y git dialog


The following commands will download RetroPie:


cd

git clone git://github.com/petrockblog/RetroPie-Setup.git


The following commands will install RetroPie:


cd RetroPie-Setup

chmod +x retropie_setup.sh

sudo ./retropie_setup.sh


On the next screen, select "Binaries Based Installation". This will take quite some time, so grab a cold drink and chill out for a bit. 


Once completed, you will be presented with a series of screens to install additional files for certain emulators. Simply follow the steps on-screen or skip past this by clicking "OK". Next, select "Perform Reboot" to reboot the Raspberry Pi and you will be return back to the desktop. 


Disable Booting to Desktop


To disable booting to the desktop, open the terminal and run the following command:


sudo raspi config


This will launch a menu with setup options. Select "Boot Options" and then select "Text Console, automatically logged in a 'pi' user". Then, select "Finish" and "Reboot". 


From now on, your pi will boot to a command prompt instead of the desktop.


Adding Roms

Now, you need roms for your Pi. This can be done in many ways. You can either download them using the included web browser or copy them from a USB device like a flash drive or external hard drive. To do this, simply, start the desktop with the "startx" command. The roms will need to be copied to the following location on your Raspberry Pi:


/home/pi/RetroPie/roms/


In this folder are several different folders for the different emulators. Copy the roms to the appropriate folders. 


You can also copy roms over your local network. In order to do this, you will need to configure network sharing on your Raspberry Pi. This can ge a little tricky, so follow the guide HERE at your own risk. 


Booting to EmulationStation by Default


Once you have your roms copies and your joysticks/controllers configured in EmulationStation, its time to setup your Pi to boot into Emulation Station be default. To do this, boot to the desktop with "startx" and once there, open the terminal. Run the following command:


sudo leafpad /etc/profile


This will bring you to a text file that needs to be modified. Scroll all the way to the bottom and add the following line:


[ -n "${SSH_CONNECTION}" ] || emulationstation


Now close and save the file. Now if you reboot your Raspberry Pi, it will boot directly into Emulation Station. If you ever need to get back to the desktop or text prompt, exit Emulation Station by following the menu options. 


And thats it! You should now be up and running with RetroPie and Emulation Station. I hope that helps! If you need additional information, I will post my sources below. 


Happy Gaming!


Sources: PetRockBlog | Raspberry Pi Forums | AndyMardell

5 Tips For Aspiring YouTubers

Posted on February 22, 2016 at 4:05 PM Comments comments (0)
As time goes on and more YouTuber's find success, the allure of obtaining a career on YouTube is far more appealing than ever. But too many people dive head-first into this expecting to get rich and famous quickly. As a YouTuber myself, I can tell you that it doesn't work that way. Far from it in fact. Making a successful YouTube channel isn't easy and what success is varies depending on your views. 

I often see many newcomers make some serious mistakes. So I thought I would provide some key tips to starting out on YouTube. So lets get started!

#1. Start for the right reasons.

This is the biggest mistake made by most new YouTubers. Why do they start? For money and fame. The moment you start for money and fame, you have already set yourself up for failure. You should start for fun! Find something you're passionate about and share it with the world. When  you start for monetary gain or social status, you aren't genuine. You aren't yourself. Your mind is set on making money or gaining views and subscribers. Your audience can easily pick up on that and it will hurt you very quickly. So don't start thinking you will make money fast and become an internet celebrate. Start because you want to share something with others and have some fun doing so in the process. 

#2. Don't break the bank on expensive equipment. 

This is a mistake I see happen all the time. New YouTuber gets started and before they make a single video, they spend tons of money on a new editing computer, software, lighting, microphones and everything else they think they need only to realize its harder than they thought or they don't see the kind of growth they expected and quit shortly after, wasting their entire investment in the process. When I started, I didn't have the best gear. Just a cheap camera and an idea. Thats it! I didn't have a fancy computer. I had a cheap Dell Inspiron B130 with Windows Movie Maker and a Kodak Digital Camera that could do VGA Quality videos. THIS was my start. Over time, I slowly purchased upgrades. Little by little, I continued to improve the quality of my content and find low cost alternatives to high-end gear. And while my setup isn't the most professional out there, its come a long way from where it used to be. My point here is simple. Don't spend a ton of money up front only to quickly realize YouTube isn't for you. Test the waters first with what you have and if you like what you see, then think about buying better gear. No need to waste money if you don't know for sure if you'll need it. 

#3. Stay true to yourself. 

So you've started your channel and you have what you need to start making videos. So what do you make videos about? One rule of thumb? DON'T try to do what everyone else is doing. There are tons of vloggers, let's players and reacters out there. So don't try to imitate them. You will just get lost in the crowd. That's not to say you can't make similar content. But don't become a carbon copy of your favorite YouTuber. Be yourself! Your originality will make you stand out. So no matter what you do, just BE YOURSELF! Don't imitate. Innovate! Bring something new to the table and the audience will come. 

#4. Don't be a pest. 

This will hurt your channel more than anything. We've all seen it. Look at any big YouTuber's comment threads and you will see posts like, "Sub4Sub?", "Please checkout my channel!" and "Please shout me out!" This is the fastest way to get ignored by your favorite content creator which is obviously counter-productive to what you are trying to accomplish. That's not to say you can't ask for help or advice from a YouTuber. But there is a right way to do it and a wrong way to do it. This is the wrong way. The right way would be to contact them in private via private message, email or social media and ask for advice. Ask them to checkout your channel and give you advice if they if they have time. And don't bug them by asking them over and over again. Just once and be kind in the process. They might actually respond since this is a much more refreshing than the usually annoying "Look at me!!!" behavior we often run into. As a YouTuber myself, I can tell you more often than not I respond to channels asking for advice than I do those that spam my comments or inbox for my attention. So be kind with your requests...not a nuisance. 

#5. Approach MCNs with caution.

Everyone wants to be partnered and make money on YouTube. So what do they do? They jump head first into a contract with the first MCN (Multichannel Network) that gives them attention. Partnering is all good and fine, but do it smart. Many networks are looking to screw you over and sign you up for lengthy contracts that benefit themselves in the long run. So do your research first. Checkout the networks you are interested in and find out what others are saying about them. Try to find information on current and past partner experiences and find out what they offer to you. A partner network should be providing you some level of support, whether it be legal protection or access to services that you can use to grow your channel and cater to your audience. After all, you should get something out of it since they are taking a cut of your earnings. Speaking of their cut, read the contract thoroughly. Make sure they aren't giving you a bad deal and that the length of the contract is something you are comfortable with. If anything seems off to you, pass on their deal. You are in no way obligated to take their offer. Just know that once you sign a deal, you are locked in until your contract is up. And even then, you have to give them adequate notice before they renew your contract. I eventually partnered with Maker Studios and they have been good to me up to this point. But before signing with them, I had been approached by several other partner networks, all offering bum deals. Also don't forget that you don't necessarily need a network. You can partner directly with YouTube which has its own set of pros and cons. Just evaluate all your options before you jump into any commitments. 

As a bonus, I will give you one extra tip. And that's to have some damn fun! I find too many people who take this stuff seriously and as a result, it becomes more work and less fun. YouTube was meant to be something entertaining and exciting. A hobby of sorts. And no one likes a hobby that feels like work. So make the best of it and have fun in the process. If you play your cards just right, you may be able to make a living doing this! Just don't make that a priority. If it happens, it happens.